The List: A Font That Improves Recall and My New Go-To Weeknight Meal

Plus, the surprising way Cupcakes and Cashmere impacted my weekend.
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A few weeks ago, I posted to Twitter and Instagram asking for your help to surprise Jonah's grandmother, Shirley, for her hundredth birthday, by arranging for her to throw the opening pitch for the Milwaukee Brewers. In her century (!) of living in Milwaukee, and fifty years of the Brewers being a team, she's never missed a game. And guess what? We made it happen through the kindness and contacts of this incredible community! The evening before Jonah and I flew into Milwaukee for the weekend, we Facetimed her with other family members to tell her the big news, and she said, "I think this is the first time in my life I've been speechless!" On Friday night, her three sons walked her out to the field for the pitch, while over twenty family members (including her 96-year-old "baby sister") cheered her on from the stands. The Brewers even generously gifted her a jersey that said her nickname, "Nana," and jersey number (100, duh) on the back. Shirley's a toughie, but when I told her about how followers on Instagram rallied to make this happen, she teared up saying, "The cupcakes and cashmere women made this happen?" It felt so special to be able to share the strength of this community with her in such a tangible way. It never would have happened without you—thank you! Here's what else I'm loving this week: 

1

The first thing I read in any cookbook are the acknowledgements. It's one of the relics (and benefits) from working in food, but learning who recipe-tested and edited the book is good indication of what to expect from the recipes themselves. So when Liz Moody, former food director and Editor-at-Large at mindbodygreen, sent me her cookbook Healthier Together (out tomorrow), I flipped straight to the back and learned in her "thank you" to her husband that she didn't eat vegetables before meeting him. She explains more in her intro, but this fact blew my mind since the cookbook is filled with gorgeous, food-appreciating, vegetable-heavy recipes. I dog-eared Zucchini Noodle Pad See Ew, Broccoli Rice Tabbouleh with Lemon & Dill, and the recipe for a healthier version of Panda Express's Orange Chicken (which anyone will tell you is my favorite food). But the recipe I couldn't wait to dive into was the one on the cover: Falafel Flatbread, which she tops with zucchini noodles, sun-dried and quartered tomatoes, and red pepper Muhammara. Hello, lover. The reason I love this recipe so much is because of how customizable it is. You could easily swap out any of the suggested toppings with riffs on vegetables already in your fridge and end-up with a delicious weeknight meal. This is a cookbook I can't wait to cook my way through, but in the meantime, Liz was gracious enough to share this recipe with you all:

Falafel Flatbread
Serves 2

2 cups chickpea flour
1 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro
1 teaspoon ground cumin
½ teaspoon ground coriander
¼ teaspoon chili powder
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
8 tablespoons avocado oil

Optional toppings: Red Pepper Muhammara, Yogurt, Toasted walnuts, Chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley, Tahini, Chopped cucumbers, Chopped tomatoes, Torn spinach, Chopped purple onion, Fresh lemon juice

1. In a large bowl, whisk together the chickpea flour, salt, garlic, parsley, cilantro, cumin, coriander, chili powder, lemon juice, 2 cups of water, and 6 tablespoons of avocado oil. Let the mixture soak for 30 to 60 minutes to hydrate the flour. 

2. Preheat the broiler with the rack in the center position. 

3. Place a 10-inch cast-iron skillet in the oven to heat up, about 5 minutes. Carefully remove the pan. Swirl in 1 tablespoon of avocado oil to coat the bottom, then pour in half the flatbread batter. Tilt the pan until the batter is evenly spread. Return the pan to the oven and broil for 3 to 5 minutes, until the edges are brown and toasty. 

4. Remove the pan from the oven and gently slide the flatbread onto a plate. Repeat with the remaining batter. 

5. Smear the flatbreads with muhammara and/or yogurt on top as desired.

2

As a general rule of thumb, I avoid anything with "Millennial" in the title because it often comes off as condescending, like it's addressing a generation of dummies who can't figure out how to move out of our parents' basements. Rant aside, I'm glad I pushed past the "Millennial" to this podcast! True, some of the topics Shannah addresses are fairly basic, but she also breaks-down all things financial planning, from budgeting to buying a house and paying off debt, in a way that's understandable and free of judgement. I particularly love the episode on how to "Crockpot Your Savings." 

I also really enjoyed this article on goop on Farnoosh Torabi's tips for financial security. 

3

Sans Forgetica is a font designed by behavioral scientists to aid in recall. It's intentionally a little difficult to read, using breaks in letters and slants, so your brain has to focus just a second longer to translate it into something legible. That extra bit of concentration helps your brain "engage in deeper processing," for everything from memorizing a poem to a study guide! You can download the font for free here, or even download the Chrome extension which changes every website into Sans Forgetica font! Make your next study guide or presentation in it, and see what happens...

P.S., If you live in L.A. (or any major city!).. tickets go on sale tomorrow for the Spring Edition of Pop-Up Magazine. It's a "live" performance of a magazine, kind of like the best podcast you've ever listened to, with art and music to support each piece. I've attended the last three, and loved each so much the row of friends and family I go with grows for each performance. And the Hammer Museum is hosting a discussion on the Mueller Report, assessing its potential impact this Wednesday—looks like an interesting panel!