10 Reality Shows Worth Binging Tonight Now That 'The Bachelor' is (Almost) Over

Filling the Pilot Pete-sized hole in our screens one show at a time.
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Our entire team is extremely devoted to The Bachelor, which we watch most weeks from Emily's couch. So, when it ends tonight, we'll be left with a Pilot-Pete sized hole in our hearts (and screens). Fortunately, our team recently picked up a number of reality shows we love. Unfortunately, we all love different ones so we have no idea what it means when Leslie exclaims "Lauren and Cameron forever!" or Natalie talks about Silky Nutmeg Ganache (still don't). Here are ten of our favorite binge-worthy reality shows:

Ugly Delicious: In Season 1 of Ugly Delicious, host David Chang travels the world—from Italy to Japan—to break down cultural misconceptions about food, including an entire episode about tacos with René Redzepi, and a heated debate on stuffed pasta vs. dumplings. I've always loved Anthony Bourdain's Parts Unknown (RIP), and I feel that David Chang fills the shoes of an adventurous host as well as one can. He preserves the food's culture while asking critical questions of its history and what sharing food across borders means. - Emily

Love is Blind: I've already written about this show on Instagram, in Stories, and on The List but all that should only go to show how much I love it. Like any good attention-span-minded-show, it cuts through the "boring" parts, like rose ceremonies and limo reveals, and straight to the chase. By the end of the first episode, five days into the show's "experiment," a couple is engaged and I was convinced soul mates exist. - Leslie

Queer Eye: Unless you've been living under a rock, you know and worship the ground JVN, Tan, Karamo, Bobby, and Antoni walk on. I'm assuming the Queer Eye reboot is in your "Watch Again" tab on Netflix, but if it isn't, get comfy on the couch and gear up for laughs, tears, and a show that will restore your faith in humanity. The Fab Five are all fantastic in their own right, but are even better together. - Jess

Goggle Box: Let me just say that I've watched a lot of television in my time on this earth, and reality shows are at the top of the list. Gogglebox is an incredible British show that shows real families, of all different backgrounds, watching television together. The show gives insight into their commentary on everything from Love Island to international politics. It's so real and hilarious, you'll find yourself looking forward to it each week. - Katie

The Voice: I've only seen one episode of American Idol, but I've watched at least 8 seasons of The Voice. Maybe it's the judges, maybe it's the "blind" audition format, or maybe it's just the high-school theater kid in me, but I freaking love this show. It doesn't have quite the pop-star making quality as American Idol does, but that doesn't bother me. Come for the banter between Adam Levine and Blake Shelton, stay for the amazing singers you might discover (Addison Agen, Cassadee Pope, or Jordan Smith, anyone?!) - Kelly

Rupaul's Drag Race: If, upon reading the title, you thought that I might be recommending a show about car racing, I need you to take a pause, reassess your life up until this point for about three seconds, and start your engines for Season 12 of the greatest show on earth!!! Drag Race, a reality competition series searching for "America's Next Drag Superstar," features all of the talent of Project Runway AND America's Got Talent combined, the pageantry and drama of America's Next Top Model, the quotability of Sex and the City, iconic guest judges like AOC AND Chaka Khan, and more glitter than my little heart could ever desire. It is political, creative, inspiring, funny, and undeniably FABULOUS! (P.S. If you are interested in learning more about the history of drag, particularly the important work done by queens and trans-womxn of color, I highly recommend watching Paris is Burning. It is now on Netflix!) - Natalie

Love Island: Okay listen: Love Island is bad, but also kind of good. It's very similar to Bachelor in Paradise–a bunch of attractive 20-somethings live in a gigantic house together with nothing to do but drink, lay by the pool, go on dates, and wait for "re-couplings", but I actually really like that an engagement isn't the end goal. The goal of Love Island is to be "crowned" the winning couple by the public, which comes with a reward of $50,000. The winning couple either splits the money and leaves together, or one person takes the entire $50K and runs. I started with the Australian version (Season 1) and actually prefer it to the UK version, which is the original. That being said, it's exactly the same show with different accents, so start with whatever season you want. - Kelly

The MTV/VH1 Archives: I have pretty much no rhyme or reason to why I love a reality show. I've binged Say Yes to the Dress as quickly as Love Island. I truly love it all. Recently, Hulu has added all of the old classics like I Love New York (a dating competition with the infamous, New York) and My Super Sweet 16 (showing spoiled teens throwing lavish parties). It gives insight into the early 2000s lunacy and is so funny to watch as a group. I highly recommend taking a walk down memory lane with this.- Katie

Shark Tank: I honestly forgot that Shark Tank qualifies as a "reality show" because I feel like I've actually learned something useful from it! I've been watching since 2013 and even invented a Shark Tank drinking game with some similarly obsessed friends (ah, my 20s). I've owned two of the most successful Shark Tank products of all time, the Ring video doorbell and the Scrub Daddy, and I've tried a handful of others like Cousins Maine Lobster, Bantam Bagels, and Kodiak Cakes. I'm definitely that person who yells "That was featured on Shark Tank!!" when I see products in the wild. If you enjoy entrepreneurship, cool new products, or the art of negotiation, give Shark Tank a try (if you haven't already). When you're all caught up, start watching The Profit. - Kelly 

I Am Jazz: Every time I watch Jazz and the rest of the Jennings family on TV, I am simply blown away by their authenticity, vulnerability, and incredible fight. Jazz is not a teenager who signed on to do a reality show for the fame or the PR packages. She tells her story as a transgender young womxn going through the troubles and tribulations of high school and of transitioning in an effort to lift the voices and lived experiences of a community that is otherwise largely excluded from American popular culture. More than anything, this is a show about seeking acceptance, something we can all relate to in some way or another.  - Natalie